Trading Information in Tanzania

by Mialy Andriamahefazafy, Environmental Policy Specialist, Madagascar

Last July, Blue Ventures had the chance to share our work in Madagascar during the 16th biennial International Institute of Fishery Economics and Trade (IIFET) conference, in Dar es Salam.

The theme of the conference was the tangible possibilities of fisheries management: the economics of sustainable fisheries aquaculture and seafood trade. One of the primary messages that we could share with each other was the advantages of community run management of fisheries; which has demonstrated to have large economic benefits for fishers.. Another important discussion point was that aquaculture  represents a potentially significant opportunity for local communities.

Mialy represented Blue Ventures at the IIFET conference

There were over two hundred fisheries economists from all over the world, and a few conservation practitioners thrown in the mix for good measure. We presented the economic results of our community-based aquaculture work  to the eager audience, as well as the preliminary findings from our fishery policy work regarding foreign fishing access agreements in Madagascar.

Our first presentation on sea cucumber aquaculture demonstrated the profitability of this project for the farmers in the village of Tampolove, SW Madagascar. It was encouraging to see the audience so engaged with this community based farming project, and how other countries were inspired to become involved in the same type of aquaculture initiatives.

Our aquaculture work was well recieved

Our second presentation on the fishery access agreements raised a different kind of interest. The attendees from the more developed countries were fascinated by how the Madagascan fishery access agreements were not written for the purpose of resource sustainability. It was also interesting to see our projects presented by different academics and practitioners, for instance a student from the University of Hawaii talked about the value of ecosystem services in the Velondriake locally managed marine area.

The IIFET conference was a great opportunity for conservationists working in policy to share experiences in the reality of fisheries management; both in terms of the economics and projections for the future.

Sharing experiences amongst conservation practitioners helps to shape the future of marine resource management

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As Blue Ventures' resident environmental lawyer, Mialy is responsible for advising colleagues, partner organisations and communities on matters relating to environmental law and policy. Her work with Blue Ventures covers a range of disciplines including; fisheries, carbon finance, endangered species and environmental management. After studying public law at the University of Antananarivo, Mialy received her Masters in Environmental Law and Climate Change from Pace Law School New York. Before joining Blue Ventures, Mialy advised the Mission of the Comoros to the United Nations regarding the adoption of international treaties. She has also worked as an environmental law consultant on cases crossing a broad range of environmental management-related issues, including; environmental justice, community-based management and fisheries. Fascinated by the role of advocacy in environmental management and sustainable development, Mialy is motivated by an ambition to improve Madagascar's environmental law and assist civil society organisations in understanding the Malagasy legal framework. "Blue Ventures has huge potential to change things for the better in Madagascar. Having visited communities that Blue Ventures is working with, I've been able to see how conservation has changed the future for coastal communities for the better. BV's integration of local communities in all its programs serves as a valuable model from which other conservation groups and NGOs can learn, in Madagascar and beyond. For me, Blue Ventures is the pillar Madagascar needs, to strengthen its capacity for marine conservation and environmental governance".
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About Mialy Andriamahefazafy

As Blue Ventures' resident environmental lawyer, Mialy is responsible for advising colleagues, partner organisations and communities on matters relating to environmental law and policy. Her work with Blue Ventures covers a range of disciplines including; fisheries, carbon finance, endangered species and environmental management. After studying public law at the University of Antananarivo, Mialy received her Masters in Environmental Law and Climate Change from Pace Law School New York. Before joining Blue Ventures, Mialy advised the Mission of the Comoros to the United Nations regarding the adoption of international treaties. She has also worked as an environmental law consultant on cases crossing a broad range of environmental management-related issues, including; environmental justice, community-based management and fisheries. Fascinated by the role of advocacy in environmental management and sustainable development, Mialy is motivated by an ambition to improve Madagascar's environmental law and assist civil society organisations in understanding the Malagasy legal framework. "Blue Ventures has huge potential to change things for the better in Madagascar. Having visited communities that Blue Ventures is working with, I've been able to see how conservation has changed the future for coastal communities for the better. BV's integration of local communities in all its programs serves as a valuable model from which other conservation groups and NGOs can learn, in Madagascar and beyond. For me, Blue Ventures is the pillar Madagascar needs, to strengthen its capacity for marine conservation and environmental governance".