Category: Ambanja (Madagascar)

We’ve been working Ambanja on Madagascar’s northwest coast since 2013, supporting local communities to conserve mangrove, seagrass and coastal wetland habitats using a range of management approaches and financing mechanisms.

Bees and trees: alternative livelihoods in Ankingabe

Blue Ventures’ Digital Media Assistant Ben Honey recently visited Ankingabe village to find out about the community-led beekeeping and fuelwood plantations.

/ Jun 15, 2017

Dingadigana: an alternative livelihood opportunity in northwest Madagascar

As fisheries face unprecedented pressures, coastal communities are looking for economic opportunities beyond fishing. The villages of Ambiky and Ambolobozo have responded with an innovative and promising new aquaculture project: sea cucumber farming.

/ Feb 22, 2017

Mysterious mangrove mice: an unexpected encounter

by Zo Andriamahenina, Geospatial Scientist, Blue Forests, Madagascar   We were nearing the end of five months of forest inventory work in the mangroves of Ambaro-Ambanja Bay, northwest Madagascar. After almost three weeks of solid rain during our stay in...

/ Jun 22, 2015

Kola tea, crabs and key informants

by Charlie Gough, Monitoring and Evaluation Coordinator, UK I drink tea in the afternoon, primarily because I am very ‘English’, but also because coffee seems to have a strange effect on me past midday and I start getting the jitters!...

/ May 19, 2015

Putting Madagascar on the (Google) Map

by Leah Glass, Blue Carbon Project Manager, Madagascar I’m writing this blog whilst drifting down the Sambirano River in northwest Madagascar on a traditional pirogue. On a ‘normal’ work day I’d be on my way to visit one of mangrove...

/ Oct 22, 2014

Making a living from the forests between land and sea

by Kitty Brayne, Country Coordinator, Madagascar  I’m in a fishing village, but I can’t see the sea. Ankazomborona is perched on the edge of a muddy channel separating land from a forbidding forest of twisted mangrove trees, their roots veering...

/ Oct 1, 2014

The most valuable marine resources in Madagascar

by Fran Humber, Conservation Programmes Manager, UK I have just visited NW Madagascar, speaking to shark fishers and community members to explore the potential for expanding our mobile phone data collection on shark fisheries to this region. Up to this...

/ Jun 25, 2014

Staff Q&A with Zo Andriamahenina, Blue Forests Research Technician

In the latest instalment in our series of staff Q&As, we ask Zo Andriamahenina, Blue Forests Research Technician, some searching questions about science, conservation and superpowers… What is your scientific background? I studied Sociology at the University of Antananarivo, during which time I did...

/ May 2, 2014

Staff Q&A with Aude Carro, Blue Forests Coordinator (NW Madagascar)

In the nineteenth instalment in our series of Q&As with Blue Ventures staff, we ask Aude Carro, Blue Forests Coordinator (NW Madagascar), some searching questions about science, conservation and superpowers…

/ Feb 7, 2014

Notes from Nosy Mitseo, Madagascar: the legacy of the demand for shark fin

In Madagascar the traditional and artisanal fishery are defined by the type of boat and size of motor you use. Whilst this study focuses on sharks landed in the traditional fishery (non-motorised local sailing pirogues) which dominates south west Madagascar,...

/ Jan 2, 2014

Blue forests: progress made and looking forward

By Trevor Jones, Geospatial Analyst and Manager, Vancouver If someone had told me three years ago that I would come to work in Madagascar’s mangrove forests, I wouldn’t have believed them. Fast forward to July 2011 and I found myself commencing...

/ Aug 19, 2013

Life in the mangrove forest: what happens exactly?

by Zo Andriamahenina, Blue Forests Research Assistant, Madagascar My first time working in the mangrove forest was in February 2012. Before, I had never walked into one, so I could not picture what we would see or find in this...

/ Apr 17, 2013

Antanandahy: where the women rule the mangroves

by Sylvia Paulot and Kate England, Blue Forests team, Madagascar After winding its way west, Madagascar’s Tsiribihina River empties into the Mozambique Channel in a maze of tributaries entwined with mangroves. At the end of last year, Sylvia and Kate...

/ Mar 14, 2013

Making moves towards Madagascar’s first mangrove carbon project

by the Blue Forests Team, Madagascar Madagascar’s 5,600 km coastline includes Africa’s third largest extent of mangroves: an estimated 213,000 hectares! These “blue” forests take and store significant amounts of carbon dioxide and support a diverse and in many cases...

/ Dec 7, 2012

Blue forests: behind the scenes…

by Samir Gandhi, Blue Forests Research Assistant, Madagascar A lot has changed for me in 12 months, undoubtedly for the better. Just over a year ago I was stuck in a dead-end office job; now, I am working for Blue Ventures...

/ Oct 31, 2012